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The World's Largest Women's Film Festival
Seoul International Women's Film Festival

Under the slogan "We are so persistent!", the 25th SIWFF is ready to open up the space to share the stories of us being and living in the present moment.

Now that the prolonged pandemic is over, how do we live our changed daily lives after suffering and overcoming both physical and psychological distances?

The 25th SIWFF invites all who are persistently facing various levels of barriers despite the changes and asking questions to look for the next step to gather, network and get reconnected at this year’s festival.

Let us meet at the 25th SIWFF and be persistent ever after!

SIWFF Concert
부대행사

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Program Event
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Guest List
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Awards & Juries
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Ticket Guide
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Program Event
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Guest List
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Awards & Juries
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Ticket Guide
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New Currents

10대만의 정서와 공감대,
에너지로 가득한 작품

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Triangle

Zhino HADI HESEN

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Banel & Adama

Ramata-Toulaye SY

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Women Talking

Sarah POLLEY

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Vera

Tizza COVI, Rainer FRIMMEL

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Luka

Jessica WOODWORTH

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My Name Is Andrea

Pratibha PARMAR

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My Broken Mariko

TANADA Yuki

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Snow and the Bear

Selcen ERGUN

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Powerpuff Gals

Leonora KIEVSKY

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Divertimento

Marie-Castille MENTION-SCHAAR

Women Making Art: Shouts & Whispers

10대만의 정서와 공감대,
에너지로 가득한 작품

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Sugung – The Underwater Palace

YOO Suyeon

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Beyond the Visible – Hilma af Klint

Halina DYRSCHKA

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Apolonia, Apolonia

Lea GLOB

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Jane Campion, the Cinema Woman

Julie BERTUCCELLI

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All the Beauty and the Bloodshed

Laura POITRAS

2023.09.07
The 25th SIWFF Award Winners
The 25th SIWFF Award Winners   Discovery   Best Feature: Family Time (Tia KOUVO) Special Jury Prize: Sister, What Grows Where Land Is Sick? (Franciska ELIASSEN) Best Director: Tótem (Lila AVILÉS) Special Mention: Until Branches Bend (Sophie JARVIS)   Jury’s Comment At the Discovery section screening the first or second film of female directors from around the world, this year too, we were able to enjoy the pleasure of 'discovering' new talents who create their identity as women and their external relationships with their perception and language. The diverse range of works-including documentaries and feature films, bold genre attempts, and experimental works that explore the video itself- makes it difficult to group them into one specific trend, which is thought to be a reflection of the directors' wide-ranging concerns and interests about the world and media. Nevertheless, if one must point out a notable trend, more works than ever depict family and the various internal and external concerns and conflicts that derive from it. Perhaps we have been forced to look back and inquire into the most primal relationships because of the time of disconnection that has completely changed our way of life over the past few years. As much fun as there was, the process of selecting the award-winning work among the twelve was more fierce than ever. We had various and earnest discussions about each film and the work each judge supported. The intense consideration process led to a heated debate over the inspiration one would expect from good films. Although the judges' opinions were not unanimous, it was a process where they listened to each other and learned a lot from others and the movies in the process of selecting each film. We hope to see the following films of female directors that we have newly discovered and learned about through this screening through the SIWFF in the future.   Discovery Jury of Finals MO Eunyoung, Soda Jerk, LEE Jeong-hyang   Best Feature: Family Time (Tia KOUVO) Behind the seemingly peaceful appearance of a family gathering at the table for the first time in a long time to spend Christmas together, the film portrays long-standing conflicts and pain, problems of care, and a profound reflection on the love-hate existence of a family that cannot be broken up. The movie conveyed the universal resonance that we cannot help but experience as we live in relationships. Just as soup gets tastier the more you keep stirring it, Family Time is a work in which the power of a movie can be felt as time passes. This work will be more powerful tomorrow than today.   Special Jury Prize: Sister, What Grows Where Land Is Sick? (Franciska ELIASSEN) How fully can we understand the universe as a whole person? Sister, What Grows Where Land Is Sick? depicts the inner journey of a younger sister who discovers the other side of the world's closest yet most unfamiliar being through poetic and dreamy images. We, the judges, send our support to the journey of this film, which created its universe unknown to the world amidst the despair of an ununderstood being and the contrast between devastated nature.   Best Director: Tótem (Lila AVILÉS) The Best Director award goes to a work that the jurors felt was an incredibly confident and striking film. What stood out about Tótem was the layered perspective and the way that it was unafraid to present relationships in all their inherent complexity and messiness. Told largely through the eyes of a child, the film wrestles with themes of mortality, kinship and care. Despite the presence of death throughout the film, it is never bleak. Despite the point of view of a child, it is never naive.    Asian Shorts   Grand Prize: Fly Me to the Sea (Rox Kexin LI) Excellence Prize: When the Whistle Sounded (HSIEH Li-Ling) BNP Paribas Excellence Prize: Teleporting (KWON Ohyeon, NAM Arum, TANZAWA Chifumi, NOKA Nana) Audience Prize: Bug (MYOUNG Sejin)   Jury’s Comment This year's twenty films that made it to the finals of the Asian Shorts brilliantly portrayed the pain and anger that Asian women face and the solidarity and vitality to overcome it in their own ways. Despite the ongoing violence against them, the women firmly state their will through quiet but determined recitations in their respective places. Through the works, we met working women, women who love, care, and relate, women who look into old wounds, and women who protect themselves from the oppression of the state, patriarchy, and heterocentrism. Some films surprised us with new perspectives and unique format attempts. Some works showed the ability to produce unexpected waves while dealing with familiar themes. Jumping Club, Spasm, and Bride Stone successfully described the humiliation and absurdity of a patriarchal society. Films like Muse and Jiwon and Yulia vividly portrayed women accepting their identity as lesbians. Through twenty films, we, three judges, were able to say goodbye to the helplessness brought on by the isolation of the pandemic and gain energy to leap forward toward the world once again. We want to take this opportunity to express endless gratitude to twenty movies.      Asian Shorts of Finals KIM Soo-jung, OK Ja-yeon, WADA-MARCIANO Mitsuyo   Grand Prize: Fly Me to the Sea (Rox Kexin LI) Fly Me to the Sea, created by director Rox Kexin Li, has what it takes to stand out from the rest of the competition. Despite being a short film, the film has an excellent narrative structure, a wealth of skillful character development, and above all, the charm of the muted mis-en-scène captured by the excellent camera work. The charm of Fly Me to the Sea is reminiscent of the works of Jia Zhangke, a filmmaker who represents The Six Generation in the history of Chinese cinema. However, Rox Kexin Li does not merely emulate Jia Zhangke, but succeeds in giving a poverty-stricken, fading woman (protagonist Hao) an arresting radiance and strength. Hao, dressed as a mermaid, seems to express the beauty and hope inherent in all human beings, as she swims in a run-down, old aquarium. All I can say is that a wonderful newcomer has emerged once again from the P.R.C. cinema world.   Excellence Prize: When the Whistle Sounded (HSIEH Li-Ling) This film is like a new breeze from Taiwan. The director, Hsieh Li-Ling, and the screenwriter, Chen Ying-Ju, co-wrote the scenario. The film is a political statement by the two women through cinema: the political conflict between the P.R.C. and Taiwan is represented as the suppression and/or self-censorship towards the opening event by the female students with a Taiwanese flag and military rifles. The film retains a look at the macro world’s politics from the micro world of the girls. Their final protesting performance is outstanding, and it gives the audience hope for peace.   BNP Paribas Excellence Prize: Teleporting (KWON Ohyeon, NAM Arum, TANZAWA Chifumi, NOKA Nana) Teleporting is a work that stirred hearts through the tireless and dashing fight of four Korean and Japanese women who did not let go of unity even during the pandemic. We were able to discover another possibility and hope that we so desperately wanted to portray in the scene where overcoming physical disconnection and inviting each other's characters to a place of violence using virtual reality. We are sure the audience wants to take a proof shot at the wit and ambitious spirit of the female directors who left us in tears.     I-Teens   Grand Prize: Differentiation (KWON Yeha) Excellence Prize: Your Liberation (PARK Hyejin)   Jury’s Comment Each of the five films screened at the I-Teens this year featured the unique colors of teenage female directors. At the same time, we, the judges, think that the common denominator was that they persistently tried to capture society from the gaze of teenagers in a creative format. We felt the director's affection for the characters in each movie, and we fell in love with them, too. The protagonists in the five movies all grow knowingly or unknowingly. It was impressive that the common keyword “growth” was told by combining genres such as thriller, romance, and documentary with new subjects. Also, we enjoyed watching films that well incorporated the bubbly ideas and humor that only teenagers can have. It was a moment for us to realize that even the same teenagers had a variety of topics they wanted to speak to the world. We recognize there is no barrier to being a teenager, and we look forward to the movies they will make as they gain more experience. It took much work to determine the superiority of the works while judging. However, the process was a significant driving force for us movie-loving teenagers, and it proved that we are all very persistent people. It was an honor for us to share the world as seen by teenage female directors through films and to be able to judge them.   I-Teens Jury KIM Rana, KIM Siyeon, LEE Suhyeon, JUNG Chae-en   Grand Prize: Differentiation (KWON Yeha) The main character of Differentiation, Ah-jeong, prepares a special funeral with her mother. She feels genuine affection for Gyeong-suk, who has been liberated from the title of mother. Each cut was composed with a narrative, using the story unfolding from Ah-jeong's perspective and the metaphor of flowers. We believe the unfamiliar sense of accepting separation due to death and feeling love was well delivered to the audience. The funeral takes place in the house where loved ones were gathered. We hope to see the fruition of everything the director loves in movies in the future.   Excellence Prize: Your Liberation (PARK Hyejin) Your Liberation is a work in which you can feel the power of the war experience in everyday life that does not stop with the director but extends to her grandfather and us. The movie captures the conversation between the director and grandfather about the war simply and honestly, and the cry for liberation to the world leaves a lasting impression. It is impressive that the film is driven by interviews with people around the director who experienced the Vietnam War similarly and her relationship with his grandfather. We applaud the director for asking the audience what liberation is with the war from the perspective of a teenager.    

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